Rock on, darling.

ianbrooks:

Bodies in Space by Nathan Hoste

Nathan’s series depicts the various and scientifically accurate ways a body will succumb to the sweet embrace of death when exposed to the near-vacuum of space; from radiation sunburn to rapid decompression. More importantly, and this is something I’ve always believed, when faced with the grandeur of the Universe and simultaneously your own imminent demise, you experience an overpowering desire to inexplicably remove all of your clothes. It’s science. Prints available at etsy or Nathan’s shop.

Artist: website / inprnt

ianbrooks:

Space Echo Socks by Strathcona Stockings

Available at etsy. Why settle for the Universe at your fingertips when instead you can have them snugly carassing your toes-sies?

the-star-stuff:

Solar Storm: Why It Fizzled … for Now
Magnetism is one reason current sun storm has been relatively harmless.
Given the sheer power of this week’s solar flares—and NASA’s warning of a potentially severe geomagnetic storm, with potential disruptions of power grids, GPS, and communications—the sun storm striking us Thursday has been surprisingly soft.
And for good reason, solar physicist Alex Young explains.
Though scientists say the storm may still intensify as Friday approaches, the storm level is still at the G1 level—”minor” on the space-weather scale.
“At that level, the effects will be fairly minimal,” said Young, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “Nothing that would actually cause any problems.”
The solar storm’s gentler-than-expected treatment of Earth so far has a lot to do with the direction the storm was traveling when it hit our planet’s magnetic field, explained Young, who works on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory project.
“The Earth’s magnetic field has a northward direction to it,” he said. There’s also a magnetic direction to each solar storm, or coronal mass ejection (CME)—a burst of charged solar particles expelled from the sun the sun by the “snapping” of magnetic fields.
If, as with the current sun storm, a CME’s magnetic field points northward, its interaction with Earth’s magnetic field can be weakened—”the two are both pointed in the same direction,” Young said.
“But if they’re opposite each other—if the [storm’s] magnetic field is southward—then there’s a much stronger interaction. It allows much more energy to be pumped into Earth’s magnetosphere.”
Image courtesy SDO/NASA

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the-star-stuff:

Solar Storm: Why It Fizzled … for Now

Magnetism is one reason current sun storm has been relatively harmless.

Given the sheer power of this week’s solar flares—and NASA’s warning of a potentially severe geomagnetic storm, with potential disruptions of power grids, GPS, and communications—the sun storm striking us Thursday has been surprisingly soft.

And for good reason, solar physicist Alex Young explains.

Though scientists say the storm may still intensify as Friday approaches, the storm level is still at the G1 level—”minor” on the space-weather scale.

“At that level, the effects will be fairly minimal,” said Young, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “Nothing that would actually cause any problems.”

The solar storm’s gentler-than-expected treatment of Earth so far has a lot to do with the direction the storm was traveling when it hit our planet’s magnetic field, explained Young, who works on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory project.

“The Earth’s magnetic field has a northward direction to it,” he said. There’s also a magnetic direction to each solar storm, or coronal mass ejection (CME)—a burst of charged solar particles expelled from the sun the sun by the “snapping” of magnetic fields.

If, as with the current sun storm, a CME’s magnetic field points northward, its interaction with Earth’s magnetic field can be weakened—”the two are both pointed in the same direction,” Young said.

“But if they’re opposite each other—if the [storm’s] magnetic field is southward—then there’s a much stronger interaction. It allows much more energy to be pumped into Earth’s magnetosphere.”

Image courtesy SDO/NASA

ikenbot:

Citizen Scientists Discover Cosmic Bubbles in Milky Way Galaxy

Image: A team of volunteers pored over observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and discovered more than 5,000 “bubbles” in the disk of our Milky Way galaxy.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Oxford University

More than 5,000 space bubbles have been discovered in the disk of our Milky Way galaxy by a team of part-time citizen scientists.

These bubbles are blown by young, hot stars into the surrounding gas and dust, and indicate areas of brand-new star formation, scientists say.

“These findings make us suspect that the Milky Way is a much more active star-forming galaxy than previously thought,” Eli Bressert, an astrophysics doctoral student at the European Southern Observatory, said in a statement. “The Milky Way’s disk is like champagne with bubbles all over the place.”

About 35,000 volunteers sifted through data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope on the online Milky Way Project to make the discoveries. These citizen scientists have found about 10 times more bubbles than previous surveys.

View in High Quality →

ikenbot:

Citizen Scientists Discover Cosmic Bubbles in Milky Way Galaxy

Image: A team of volunteers pored over observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and discovered more than 5,000 “bubbles” in the disk of our Milky Way galaxy.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Oxford University

More than 5,000 space bubbles have been discovered in the disk of our Milky Way galaxy by a team of part-time citizen scientists.

These bubbles are blown by young, hot stars into the surrounding gas and dust, and indicate areas of brand-new star formation, scientists say.

“These findings make us suspect that the Milky Way is a much more active star-forming galaxy than previously thought,” Eli Bressert, an astrophysics doctoral student at the European Southern Observatory, said in a statement. “The Milky Way’s disk is like champagne with bubbles all over the place.”

About 35,000 volunteers sifted through data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope on the online Milky Way Project to make the discoveries. These citizen scientists have found about 10 times more bubbles than previous surveys.